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Organic traffic

Discussion in 'Search Engine Optimization' started by peopletrendin, Dec 4, 2014.

  1. peopletrendin New Member

    peopletrendin

    How to get organic traffic?

     
  2. Billy New Member

    Billy

    To get organic traffic you need to be in the search engine listings for specific keywords. There's too much to explain about it. You're best off reading a basic SEO course so that you can understand onpage and offpage SEO and how to properly optimize them without getting a penalty from Google. SEO is always changing, so it's a good idea to keep up to date on everything.

     
  3. toradrake Member

    toradrake

  4. Rainman New Member

    Rainman

    Ask anyone the best way to get organic traffic and they'll tell you SEO. But SEO is but one facet of getting your site noticed by the search engines. The goal of SEO is to make it easier for the search engines to find your content. The quality of your content is what will actually get you better rankings = to more organic traffic.

    What you are after is traffic and the best way to grab [organic traffic] is by getting endorsements in the form of backlinks [from other sites] that prove people approve and find your content helpful enough to link to. What follows?

    Search engines send more traffic your way.

     
    Billy likes this.
  5. Billy New Member

    Billy

    Oh yeah, there are several ways for someone to get traffic. If someone is so inclined, they can pay for it, others like using social media, and people like me, prefer SEO. Everyone has a preference, and will be better at one over the other. For me, SEO has given me the best results, I tried social a couple of times, and couldn't get my head around it, but it's always a good idea to have multiple traffic sources, because things are always changing, not just in terms of SEO, but also in other areas too (Facebook).

     
    Rainman likes this.
  6. peopletrendin New Member

    peopletrendin

    Thank you for good answer.

     
  7. ducklord Member

    ducklord

    I don't really know about SEO techniques, but after a lot of time creating and managing my own (unsuccessful) sites, blogging and reading about anything related, I've come to a kind of "equation" that seems to defines what's needed to make a website known:

    Content > Site > SEO < Search Engine

    Let me explain:

    Your Content is the most important part of all. And even if you DON'T have a site, or a way to put it online, it is and remains the most important part of the equation. And if it's truly good, it WILL get online, it WILL get indexed, it WILL receive visits, even if you do absolutely nothing about it. As proof, do a search for the work of Einstein. He didn't blog. He didn't have a website and I'm pretty sure he didn't spend hours upon hours "SEO-tuning" his "content". And yet, here it is.

    After that comes your site. Even if you don't do anything regarding SEO, it's just the "gateway" of your content to the online world, and vice versa. It doesn't have to be a GREAT site, we've seen no-design blogs on Blogger get millions of visits when their content was truly great. But it's the next thing you want to take care of, right after your content, 'cause through this you "present" your content to the readers, the ones that recognize its "greatness" and help it be known by word of mouth. At the same time, it is important 'cause through this your content is also indexed by search engines and propagated to social sites. A simple site helps the content "get out there". A great site helps it expand even more, faster. But it's all about the content, and if it sucks, then, nope, even if you find success, it won't be for long.

    SEO is what comes after the other two "things". You can't have bad content and/or a bad site and "save" them with SEO. It can't be done. Exactly like the site helps the content shine, though, and expand even more, SEO helps the site "expand" more and/or faster. It's not the first thing you should do, it's the last. And even if you do or don't do it, it doesn't guarantee success. But it can help. A lot.

    And then comes the Search Engine itself, and the way its algorithms index your pages and present them in their lists. Why the opposite to ">"? 'cause you CAN'T do something about it, so it's not important. The ">"'s I use rate the importance of each piece of the puzzle in conjunction with what you can do about them: you should pay MORE attention to your content than your site, and then MORE attention to your site than your SEO techniques. But you can do absolutely nothing about the search engine itself, except if your name is "Schmidt" and you don't go to Google to Search, Google comes to you. Mr. Schmidt. And the "<" is also used 'cause, if you ARE Eric Schmidt, or any of the Big Heads at Google, your content, your site and your SEO techniques mean nothing compared to what you can directly do to your search engine. 'cause you're Schmidt. It's like the "I'm Batman" meme :p

     
    Converse likes this.
  8. Converse Active Member

    Converse

    Good post. Ninety percent of what's really important in getting your website seen is content. Unfortunately, most of us (and I include myself) are not capable of producing really great content, so we try to pump it up with other things. However, unless you've got really great content, you'll have to keep pumping in order to get visitors to keep coming to your site.

    Because ninety percent of what's really important has to do with your content, that doesn't mean that the other stuff isn't important. If I invent something really wonderful and never show to anyone, I cannot expect to become rich and famous, at least not in my lifetime.

    There is an entire industry of SEO professionals who need for you to believe the opposite, that ninety percent of what you need can be bought from them, either by buying their services, their books, their tools, or all of these things. While most of them are frauds and charlatans, there is some truth to it, particularly when you include Google and the other search engines into the mix. They too, are selling a product, and are unwilling to give it away for free.

    Why else did MapQuest all but disappear from Google's search results once Google decided to enter the mapping game itself? Why has the Google Directory, which was never anything more than a mirror of DMOZ, remained at the top of the listings on searches for directories years after they gave up even the pretense of having their own directory?

    It is necessary to devote some effort, and even some money, if you want your website to be seen by a large number of potential fans. Rather than putting ninety percent of our efforts into SEO, perhaps it would make sense to spend a larger portion of it coming as close as we can to developing really great content.

     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2014
  9. ducklord Member

    ducklord

    Yep, I agree. My "equation" can actually be translated to "You've got 100 bucks for your site? Spend 70 on your content, 20 on your site and 10 on SEO. DON'T ignore any part of the equation but DO pay more attention to them in those exact steps. First Content, then Site, then SEO. They're ALL part of the equation. Except if you're Google!" :p

     
    Converse likes this.
  10. Jane Diaz New Member

    Jane Diaz

    First, remove and disavow bad links, create a keyword database by doing keyword research, optimize your content, encourage readers to link to your website, use internal links and use social media.

     

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